Newsroom

2015 Historic Preservation Award Nomination Forms Available

Posted on Apr 7, 2015

Nominations for the annual awards for excellence in historic preservation are being accepted by the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County through Friday, July 3, 2015. “Increased awareness of the importance of historic preservation in Lancaster County seems to be a factor in the growing acceptance of adaptive re-use of historic buildings,” said Lisa Horst, president of the board of directors for the Historic Preservation Trust.  “Lancaster’s rich historical environment is one of the leading reasons why residents and visitors alike find the city and surrounding townships and boroughs attractive.  The annual historic preservation awards recognize those in our community who are helping to keep historic Lancaster County historic through their exceptional work to save, preserve, restore and celebrate the beauty of structures built by our forefathers. Recipients will be honored at our annual awards program on Tuesday, November 10.” The historic preservation award categories are: Leadership — presented to individuals or organizations that have demonstrated the vision, wisdom and perseverance necessary to incorporate historic preservation into their long-range planning. Sustainability – presented to the owner of any historically significant structure that has demonstrated over a significant period time a commitment to historic preservation through exemplary maintenance practices. Preservation – presented to projects that comply fully with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (http://www.nps.gov/hps/tps/standguide/) A copy of the approved U. S. Department of the Interior Part III application must be submitted with the nomination form. Restoration/ Adaptive Re-use — presented to projects where the historical character of a structure is maintained through thoughtful and sensitive additions and/or restorations. Community Revitalization — presented to projects that enhance a historic area and contribute to overall neighborhood improvement. Master Craftsman — presented for the meritorious efforts to save a historic structure through master level building skills and knowledge. Historic preservation awards are presented in honor of C. Emlen Urban (1863 –1939), Lancaster’s preeminent architect who influenced Lancaster’s early architectural character.   He designed the Southern Market on Queen Street in 1888, the Watt & Shand Department Store (now the Lancaster County Convention Center) in 1898 and St. James Episcopal Church parish House on Duke Street in 1903.  “His work forms a bridge between the Victorian Era and the Modern Age,” Horst added Individual award nominations are open to recognize long-time supporters of the Preservation Trust and volunteers. The Smedley Award, named for Lancaster educator and Lancaster Intelligencer-Journal reporter Frederick H. “Chip” Smedley III (1956-2013), is for to educator or journalist who has made special contributions to broadening the public’s understanding of historic preservation in Lancaster County Nomination forms are available at the Historic Preservation Trust, 123 North Prince Street in downtown Lancaster, 717-291-5861 or director@hptrust.org.  Office hours are 9 am to 3 pm Monday through Thursday.  Forms also are available at www.hptrust.org.   Historic preservation award recipients in 2014 were: Inspiration Award (long-time service) – Dr. Paul Ripple Smedley Award (educator/journalist) – Gregg Scott Haubert/Heisey Award (volunteer) – Judy Fry LNP Media Group (Lancaster City) – Leadership Award...

Read More

The Farm at Eagles Ridge Chosen to Host the 2015 Gourmet Gala

Posted on Mar 20, 2015

The Farm at Eagles Ridge Chosen to Host the 2015 Gourmet Gala

  The Farm at Eagles Ridge at 465 Long Lane, a few miles from downtown Lancaster, has been chosen as the host site for the 2015 Gourmet Gala on Sunday, May 17, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. “As part of our on-going education outreach efforts, the Historic Preservation Trust selects a historic property in Lancaster County each year to showcase as host of our annual   gala fund raiser,” said Lisa Horst, president of the Historic Preservation Trust Board of Directors. “In addition to being a site suitable for hosting one of Lancaster’s premier social events, the site must be historically significant.  The Farm at Eagles Ridge dates back to the 1820’s, and it is an excellent example of how historic buildings can be given new lives through adaptive reuse.” The Farm at Eagles Ridge was the recipient of a 2013 preservation award for restoring its 3,200 square-foot barn which, paired with a renovated corn crib and stone farmhouse, created a unique special events venue. “It took extensive work to restore the buildings on the farm in such a way that would preserve their historic character while transforming them into a state-of-the-art facility,” said Betsy Herr, co-owner of The Farm at Eagles Ridge – today one of the most popular wedding venues in Lancaster County. More than 30 of the area’s best restaurants, caterers, bakeries, personal chefs, wineries, breweries and coffee companies will be serving their specialties. Among those are Annie Bailey’s, Lombardo’s, La Petite Patisserie, Railroad House Inn, The Scarlet Runner catering, Willow Valley Communities Culinary Services, Gypsy Kitchen, Rettew’s Catering, Hess’s Barbecue, Inn at Bully’s Restaurant & Pub, Lickity Split, Gracie’s on West Main, Toadally Caribbean, Federal Taphouse, The Horse Inn, Seasons Olive & Vinegar Taproom, Breaking Bread Catering, Pierre DeRagon (Personal Chef), Lancaster Hummus Company, Miesse Candies, Byers Butterflake Bakery, Dutch Haven Shoo Fly Pie Bakery and Grandma Jack’s Gourmet Popcorn, Sugar Whipped Bakery, Lancaster County Coffee Roasters, Twin Brook Winery, Stargazers Winery, Nissley Vineyards & Winery Estate, Saint Boniface Craft Brewing  Company, Lancaster County Brewing Company, Moo-Duck Brewery and Yards Brewing.  Zest! will give cooking demonstrations. Music for the event will be provided by Temple Avenue. Horst said Gala sponsors are being sought to join media sponsor Lancaster County Magazine and lead sponsors Willow Valley Communities and  PPL Corporation; lead supporting sponsors White Horse Construction, Shoppes at Belmont and Lancaster Solid Waste Management Authority;  and supporting sponsors Bertz, Hess & Co., Conestoga View Nursing & Rehabilitation, Donegal Insurance Group, NxtBook Media, RLPS Architects, UGA Utilities, Wohlsen Construction and Janney, Montgomery, Scott.  Other sponsors include Lusk & Associates – Sotheby’s International Realty (Anne Lusk), Antiques by Nancy & Jim, Benchmark Construction, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services (Andy Esbenshade), Berkshire Hathaway Home Services (Connie Ginder), Berkshire Hathaway Home Services (Jeff LeFevre), Brookline Builders, Certified Carpet, D. H. Funk & Sons, Delta Development Group, Galebach’s Floor Finishing, Hi-Tech Concrete Coatings & Soil Stabilization, Lancaster Ironworks, Richard Levengood Architects, LimeWorks.us, May Metzger and Zimmerman, Penningdon Partners, Perron Construction, Preservation Works, Puffer Morris...

Read More

2015 Gourmet Gala Sponsors

Posted on Mar 12, 2015

2015 Gourmet Gala Sponsors

        The Farm at Eagles Ridge  (host site)       Lancaster County Magazine (media sponsor)               PPL Electric Utilities ($2000)       Willow Valley Communities ($2000)                 White Horse Construction ($1250)             Shoppes at Belmont ($1000)                 Lancaster County Solid Waste Managment Authority ($750)         Bertz, Hess & Co., LLP ($500)               Conestoga View Nursing & Rehabilitation ($500)           Donegal Insurance Group ($500)             NextBook Media  ($500)                 RLPS Architects ($500)         UGI Utilities ($500)               Wohlsen Construction ($500)             Janney, Montgomery, Scott ($400)                     Anne Lusk Lusk & Associates – Sotheby’s International Realty  ($300)               Antiques by Nancy and Jim ($250)             Benchmark Construction ($250)                     Andy Esbenshade Berkshire Hathaway Home Services ($250)                   Jeff LeFevre Berkshire Hathaway Home Services ($250)                       Connie Ginder Berkshire Hathaway Home Services ($250)                 Brookline Builders ($250)           Certified Carpet ($250)                 D H Funk & Sons ($250)                       Delta Development Group, Inc. ($250)                   Galebach’s Floor Finishing ($250)                   Hi-Tech Concrete Coatings & Soil Stablization ($250)               Lancaster Ironworks ($250)           Richard Levengood Architects ($250)               LimeWorks.us ($250)               May. Metzger and Zimmerman ($250)             Perron Construction ($250)                 Preservation Works ($250)               Puffer Morris Realty ($250)                 Pyfer Reese Straub Gray & Farhat ($250)             Rhoads Energy ($250)         Rohrer’s One Hour Heating and Air Conditioning ($250)               RSC Heating & Air Conditioning ($250)             Select Security ($250)             Senior Tax Strategists ($250)           J. C. Snavely & Sons, Inc. ($250)               Tippetts/Weaver architects ($250)               Two Dudes Painting ($250)             Ville Painters ($250)...

Read More

2015 Watch List of Most Threatened Historic Properties in Lancaster Couny Released

Posted on Jan 12, 2015

The 2015 Watch List of the most threatened historic properties in Lancaster County has been released by the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County.  Three properties from the 2014 Watch List have been replaced – the David Mayer Farmstead  (c. 1870-1874) at 1580 Fruitville Pike in Manheim Township, former Long Funeral Home (1895) at 855 Chestnut St. in Columbia and  the log house & root cellar (c. 1800-1825) at   522 Norwood Rd. in Columbia. “Two of the three properties taken off the list – the David Mayer Farmstead and the former Long Funeral Home – are being restored for new uses,” said Lisa Horst, president of the Historic Preservation Trust Board of Directors   “The log house in Columbia, unfortunately, was in no condition to be restored or moved by its new owners.” Horst went on to say that the Preservation Trust is especially pleased to be working with the developers of the David Mayer Farmstead because it demonstrates the positive results of what can happen when the Preservation Trust and private enterprise collaborate.  “Ideally, it would have been best to keep the large barn and adjacent smaller farm buildings where they are.  That was not an option so they are being moved, saved and rebuilt nearby at the Ironstone Ranch in Elizabethtown,” she added.  “The Italiante-style mansion will be restored by developer Phil Frey.  We are fortunate that he and others at Manbel Devco respect the farmstead’s history and unique environment.” The three sites addedto the list are the Musselman/Christian Herr II House (1734) at 421 Penn Grant Rd. in West Lampeter Township, the James Anderson II House (1721-1790) in East Donegal Township and the Armstrong  pedestrian bridge (1922) in the City of Lancaster. “Being on the Watch List is not a negative because each of the 10 properties represents an opportunity to save a significant structure that helps define our Lancaster Countyhistory,” said Shirlie O’Leary, chair of the Preservation Trust committee that prepares the Watch List. “Everyone loves historic restoration after it occurs, but it takes vision, leadership and resources to make it happen.  The Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County works to bring together individuals and organizations to make it happen.” Properties on the Historic Preservation Trust’s 2015 Watch List are:   James Anderson II House (1721-1790) – North Waterford Avenue, East Donegal Township James Anderson II, who built the center section of this house in the mid 1780’s and in 1742 he initiated Anderson’s Ferry on the Susquehanna River.  In his will, he bequeathed the house to his grandson, James Anderson IV who, in 1812, laid out an area named Waterford that became the western end of Marietta. In 1803 the house was sold out of the family. Later additions date from c.1810 (east) to 1835 (west). The original section is Georgian.  Today, the house is in significant disrepair. Armstrong Pedestrian Bridge (1922)  – rear of the 700 block of Harrisburg Pike and on the north side of Harrisburg Pike, City of Lancaster Tens of thousands of...

Read More

Three Elected to Historic Preservation Trust Board of Directors

Posted on Dec 16, 2014

 Danielle Keperling,  Dick Lundgren and Gary Klinger have been elected to the board of directors of the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County.   Keperling is chief operating officer of Historic Restorations in Lancaster, executive director of the Central Pennsylvania Preservation Society and a lecturer on maintaining and preserving historic homes.  The two books that she has co-authored are on how to maintain the architectural integrity of historic buildings and how to manage projects to meet schedules while controlling costs and achieving client satisfaction.  Keperling is a member of the Preservation Trust’s education and communications committee.                                                                                                   Lundgren, a retired commercial real estate brokerage chief executive officer from Boston, Mass., has served both as a director and as an advisory council member for a variety of non-profit organizations in the fields of historic preservation and land conservation in Massachusetts and New York.  His educational and professional background is in city planning and real estate investment.  Lundgren is a member of the Preservation Trust’s preservation action committee, and he served as a docent during the Preservation Trust’s fall Historic Lancaster Walk & Talk Tour.     Klinger manages the customer experience and order engineering departments at Meridian Products.  In addition to restoring his historic 1900 home in Ephrata, Pa., he owns a woodshop where he designs, builds, repairs and refinishes furniture. He also is a freelance reporter for the Ephrata Review and Lititz Record Express.  He serves as vice chair of the Ephrata Civil Service Commission and on the publicity committee at the Historical Society of the Cocalico Valley. Klinger is a member of the Preservation Trust’s preservation action committee.                                                                                                                                         Officers for Preservation Trust continuing on the Executive Committee are Lisa Horst (The Horst Group), president; Dana Clark (Tippetts/Weavers Architects), vice president and Mike Richardson (Janney Montgomery Scott), treasurer. John Metzger (May, Metzger & Zimmerman, LLP) will serve as the at-large-member on the Executive Committee. Ron Funk will serve as secretary.     About the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County Founded in 1966 to “stem the rapid destruction of historic properties in Lancaster County,” the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County’s mission is to encourage and facilitate historic preservation throughout Lancaster County.  The Preservation Trust has been directly involved in preserving important Lancaster County landmarks and has provided advice, assistance and guidance in the protection of others.  The trust is a member-supported, 501(c)3 non-profit organization located in the historic Sehner-Ellicott-von Hess House (1787) at 123 North Prince Street in downtown Lancaster.  Visit www.hptrust.org for additional...

Read More

Historic Preservation Trust to Welcome First Friday Visitors at 123 North Prince Street

Posted on Dec 4, 2014

December 5th First Friday visitors to 123 North Prince Street, headquarters of the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County, will be stepping back in time. The building is where Andrew Ellicott taught Meriwether Lewis navigation skills in 1803, prior to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. “We will have wreaths, mantels with greenery, fires in the fireplaces and refreshments,” said Lisa Horst, president of the Historic Preservation Trust Board of Directors.   “Visitors are invited to tour this finely restored example of Georgian architecture and view exhibits outlining the story of its restoration.  Andrew Ellicott lived here from 1801 to 1813.” Ellicott (1754-1820) was a master astronomer, engineer, and surveyor.  He completed the survey of the District of Columbia and helped establish the famous Mason-Dixon border, among  many other state boundary surveys. He was personally commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson to train Captain Meriwether Lewis prior to the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806) that opened up the West for settlement. In later years, Ellicott was the commandant of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. The Historic Preservation Trust accepted the donation of the 123 North Prince Street in 1996 through the generous gift of the Louise Steinman von Hess foundation. Information about First Friday at 123 North Prince Street is available at 717-291-5861 or joepatterson@hptrust.org.  Visitors also can inquire about becoming Historic Preservation Trust members and the Preservation Trust’s historic site marker plaque program.   About the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County Founded in 1966 to “stem the rapid destruction of historic properties in Lancaster County,” the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County’s mission is to encourage and facilitate historic preservation throughout Lancaster County.  The Preservation Trust has been directly involved in preserving important Lancaster County landmarks and has provided advice, assistance and guidance in the protection of others.  The trust is a member-supported, 501(c)3 non-profit organization located in the historic Sehner-Ellicott-von Hess House (1787) at 123 North Prince Street in downtown Lancaster.  Visit www.hptrust.org for additional...

Read More