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amishSchoolhouse

Gone, But Not Forgotten: Amish Schoolhouse

Gone, But Not Forgotten: Weather Mountville Barn In 2008, the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County created a calendar series entitled “Gone, but not Forgotten” as a reminder of some things that aren’t here anymore. The Amish schoolhouse Barn was the featured image for March of that year and painted by J. Richard Shoemaker. Artist’s…

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Sign up for the ‘Secret Trust Adventure’ today!

Update March 21, 2021. It was a whirlwind of a weekend! Scores of people joined the crusade to find the treasure at the end of the Secret Trust Adventure. The Longnecker family using a single segment of the GPS coordinates and their superior local history skills to decipher the poem located the cache this evening.…

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Blast from the Past: Canoeing Guide to the Historic Conestoga

Imagine our pleasant surprise to rediscover this advertisement for the Sehner-Ellicott-von Hess House on the back of the Canoeing Guide to the Historic Conestoga published by the Conestoga Valley Association in 1976.  Here’s the text of the ad. Treasured Lancaster Landmark – Built 1780 Home of Andrew Ellicott Home of Penna. Chapter No. I Lewis &…

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Architectural Tour of Mount Joy: Bube’s Brewery

Central Hotel / Bube’s Brewery / Cooper Shed 102 North Market Street Mount Joy, PA 17552 Bube’s Brewery is the most important and still surviving late 1800s brewery and one of the few late Victorian hotels in intact condition, remaining in Lancaster County. The entire complex, including the brewery, cooper’s shed, and bottling works buildings,…

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Gone, But Not Forgotten: Weather Mountville Barn

Gone, But Not Forgotten: Weather Mountville Barn In 2008, the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County created a calendar series entitled “Gone, but not Forgotten” as a reminder of some things that aren’t here anymore. The Weathered Mountville Barn was the featured image for February of that year and painted by J. Richard Shoemaker. Artist’s…

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C. Emlen Urban: Kirk Johnson Building on West King Street

For more than 45 years, the prolific Urban created many of the historic landmarks that are fundamental to the beloved character of Lancaster City. In this post, we will examine Urban’s 1911-1912 West King Street structure. This narrow building presents an elegant facade designed by C. Emlen Urban in the French Baroque style during the…

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History of Columbia: 1795 William Wright Mansion

30 South 2nd Street 1795 In 1795, William Wright, financier of the first bridge across the Susquehanna and grandson of one of the founders of the community of Columbia, built a mansion next to his aunt, Susanna Wright’s home, the Wright’s Ferry Mansion. Both of these residences originally faced the Susquehanna River but as the…

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Hidden Treasures: Historic Poole Forge

The history of this beautiful property dates back to the earliest days of our country. It was the second of three forges along the Conestoga River in Caernarvon Township, and the fourth forge constructed in Lancaster County. The story of the owners of Poole Forge is an example of the interrelationships through the marriage of…

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See the Sehner-Ellicott-von Hess House as it looked in April 1883

123 North Prince Street Lancaster, PA April 1883 This was the home and land office of Andrew Ellicott on the southeast corner of North Prince Street and Marion Street at 123 North Prince Street. Ellicott was one of America’s most famous surveyors. He lived in Lancaster at 123 North Prince Street from 1801 to 1813.…

Proudly set atop a bluff, the Martic Forge Mansion contains approximately 4,700 square feet of floor space.

Southern Conestoga Valley: Smith-Coleman House

Smith-Coleman House Martic Forge Mansion 1164 Marticville Rd, Pequea, PA 17565 circa 1727-1815 The Smith-Coleman House is comparable to the Benedict Eshleman House in terms of age, social prestige, and size, but the two houses dif­fer in their interpretation of the Georgian style. This tour offers a rare opportuni­ty to compare how German and English…